Precious STAR cufflinks - Handmade ebony and bone inlaid men cufflinks - gift idea

Precious STAR cufflinks – Handmade ebony and bone inlaid men cufflinks – gift idea

Precious hand inlaid cufflinks made using African ebony and thin bison bone sheet.
You can choose the color of the metal finish between COPPER, AGED BRASS or SILVER.
Don't miss the elegance and exclusivity of a handmade jewel.
Elegant box and handmade certificate are included

Modern technology such as CNC cutting and laser engrave combined with the traditions of "veneered marquetry" give life to these precious jewels ready for the most elegant and fashionable cuffs.
The cufflinks are polished with beeswax without using paint or chemical solvents.

This cufflinks are fully and proudly hand made in Italy

Dimensions of the skull: 14,4 mm X 17,6 mm (0,56 X 0,68 …

60,00$

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SKU: 570783297

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Product Description

Precious hand inlaid cufflinks made using African ebony and thin bison bone sheet.
You can choose the color of the metal finish between COPPER, AGED BRASS or SILVER.
Don't miss the elegance and exclusivity of a handmade jewel.
Elegant box and handmade certificate are included

Modern technology such as CNC cutting and laser engrave combined with the traditions of "veneered marquetry" give life to these precious jewels ready for the most elegant and fashionable cuffs.
The cufflinks are polished with beeswax without using paint or chemical solvents.

This cufflinks are fully and proudly hand made in Italy

Dimensions of the skull: 14,4 mm X 17,6 mm (0,56 X 0,68 iches)

Looking for something else? Check this out:
More cufflinks from our shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/GothChicAccessories?section_id=13044363

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Something about Marquetry:

The technique of veneered marquetry had its inspiration in 16th century Florence (and at Naples). Marquetry elaborated upon Florentine techniques of inlaying solid marble slabs with designs formed of fitted marbles, jaspers and semi-precious stones. This work, called opere di commessi, has medieval parallels in Central Italian "Cosmati"-work of inlaid marble floors, altars and columns. The technique is known in English as pietra dura, for the "hardstones" used: onyx, jasper, cornelian, lapis lazuli and colored marbles. In Florence, the Chapel of the Medici at San Lorenzo is completely covered in a colored marble facing using this demanding jig-sawn technique.

Techniques of wood marquetry were developed in Antwerp and other Flemish centers of luxury cabinet-making during the early 16th century. The craft was imported full-blown to France after the mid-seventeenth century, to create furniture of unprecedented luxury being made at the royal manufactory of the Gobelins, charged with providing furnishings to decorate Versailles and the other royal residences of Louis XIV. Early masters of French marquetry were the Fleming Pierre Golle and his son-in-law, André-Charles Boulle, who founded a dynasty of royal and Parisian cabinet-makers (ébénistes) and gave his name to a technique of marquetry employing tortoiseshell and brass with pewter in arabesque or intricately foliate designs. Boulle marquetry dropped out of favor in the 1720s, but was revived in the 1780s. In the decades between, carefully matched quarter-sawn veneers sawn from the same piece of timber were arranged symmetrically on case pieces and contrasted with gilt-bronze mounts. Floral marquetry came into favor in Parisian furniture in the 1750s, employed by cabinet-makers like Bernard van Risenbergh, Jean-Pierre Latz and Simon-François Oeben. The most famous royal French furniture veneered with marquetry are the pieces delivered by Jean Henri Riesener in the 1770s and 1780s. The Bureau du Roi was the most famous amongst these famous masterpieces.

Marquetry was not ordinarily a feature of furniture made outside large urban centers. Nevertheless, marquetry was introduced into London furniture at the Restoration of Charles II in 1660, the product of immigrant Dutch 'inlayers', whose craft traditions owed a lot to Antwerp. Panels of elaborately scrolling "seaweed" marquetry of box or holly contrasting with walnut appeared on table tops, cabinets, and long-case clocks. At the end of the 17th century, a new influx of French Huguenot craftsmen went to London, but marquetry in England had little appeal in the anti-French, more Chinese-inspired high-style English furniture (mis-called 'Queen Anne') after ca 1720. Marquetry was revived as a vehicle of Neoclassicism and a 'French taste' in London furniture, starting in the late 1760s. Cabinet-makers associated with London-made marquetry furniture, 1765–1790, include Thomas Chippendale and less familiar names, like John Linnell, the French craftsman Pierre Langlois, and the firm of William Ince and John Mayhew.

Although marquetry is a technique separate from inlay, English marquetry-makers were called "inlayers" throughout the 18th century. In Paris, before 1789, makers of veneered or marquetry furniture (ébénistes) belonged to a separate guild from chair-makers and other furniture craftsmen working in solid wood (menuisiers).

Tiling patterning has been more highly developed in the Islamic world than anywhere else, and many extraordinary examples of inlay work have come from Middle Eastern countries such as Lebanon and Iran.

At Tonbridge and Royal Tunbridge Wells, England, souvenir "Tunbridge wares"— small boxes and the like— made from the mid-18th century onwards, were veneered with panels of minute wood mosaics, usually geometric, but which could include complicated subjects like landscapes. They were made by laboriously assembling and gluing thin strips and shaped rods, which then could be sliced crossways to provide numerous mosaic panels all of the same design.

Marquetry was a feature of some centers of German cabinet-making from c. 1710. The craft and artistry of David Roentgen, Neuwied, (and later at Paris as well) was unsurpassed, even in Paris, by any 18th-century marquetry craftsman.

Marquetry was not a mainstream fashion in 18th-century Italy, but the neoclassical marquetry of Giuseppe Maggiolini, made in Milan at the end of the century is notable.

The classic illustrated description of 18th century marquetry-making was contributed by Roubo to the Encyclopédie des Arts et Métiers, 1770. The most thorough and dependable 20th-century accounts of marquetry, in the context of Parisian cabinet-making, are by Pierre Verlet.

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